edible food

mark c.mark c.
edited March 23 in Survival 101
I think trails should start putting up safe food in the wild page. to teach what you can and cant eat.for all regions ....lets get are brain working ...what do you think?

Comments

  • Great suggestion, Mark! I'll share it with the team.
  • Gary W.Gary W.
    edited February 11
    Desert landscape in AZ.........I always pick about a dozen or so JOJOBA beans from the pods when they are ready to be eaten....the outer covering will be splutting so easy to get the seed out.  Hohokum Tribes use to place blankets beneath the bush and shake it to drop the seeds into the blanket  :)
    One can also remove a prickly pear pad (using thick gloves or tongs)...split the pad length-wise and the inside can be eaten......very sweet...used to make jams and candy.
  • Sampling wild plants based only on a web post is dangerous.  Many edible plants are related to poisonous ones; for example, camas, wild onions, and death camas are related and are similar in appearance.  Others are edible only after special treatment or only in small quantities.  I recommend eating only those you have identified through multiple reliable sources, preferably including someone who knows about plants.
  • Totally agree with Keith M.   I always contact the Botanical Gardens with my questions....I also take guided hikes with rangers who can point out what is/is not edible in the desert.
  • I think the liability of advising people what they can and cannot eat via a webpage is too high and insufficient. Cell phones die in the wilderness and people could make terrible, lethal decisions based on what they thought they saw on a webpage just before their phone died.

    Buy books, do research online sure, but more importantly - find a local professional, take a class from someone who specializes in wild edibles and practice identifying and eating with a professional. It is quite life or death.

    That being said - it would be because of lack of education/knowledge in wild edibles that someone would die in most of the USA - here in Maine there is so much food that is crawling, growing, swimming, walking or flying around. 

    Devote the time to know beyond doubt. So many people spend time on facebook, or watching TV/netflix that they are missing out on skills that were not specialty - but were once part of every people's heritage. Fire doesn't belong to the past - it belongs to lightning, and heat and humans. Skills of the wild are getting lost to convenience, laziness, a digital age, automation, and never getting unplugged.

    Best,

    Kasey Marsters

    foxtrickadventures.com
  • FalconGuides has a "Foraging" series on edible wild foods in certain regions, including one title that covers edible plants of North America. We've got Idaho coming out next month, but there are a handful already available for those interested! 

    Best,
    Ryan Meyer

    http://www.falcon.com/books/search?q=Foraging 
  • Ryan M. said:
    FalconGuides has a "Foraging" series on edible wild foods in certain regions, including one title that covers edible plants of North America. We've got Idaho coming out next month, but there are a handful already available for those interested! 

    Best,
    Ryan Meyer

    http://www.falcon.com/books/search?q=Foraging 
    The FalconGuides foraging books are actually very good. I have the one for New England. There are some tasty treats in there. haha.  They're kind of hard to find now though. They go for like $66 on amazon. 

    Best,
    Kasey Marsters

    Fox-Trick Adventures

    https://www.amazon.com/Falcon-Foraging-England-Medicinal-Adirondacks/dp/B00E3U837K
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